The Middle School Rules of Thomas Morstead

The Middle School Rules of Thomas Morstead

By Sean Jensen

$14.99

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About 'The Middle School Rules of Thomas Morstead'

About

“Before he earned a Super Bowl ring and started a foundation, he had to survive middle school.”

Thomas Morstead entered his 12th NFL season with the New Orleans Saints, distinguishing himself as one of the league’s top punters. In Super Bowl XLIV, he executed an onside kick that the Saints recovered and parlayed into a touchdown to take a 13-10 lead. The Saints defeated the Indianapolis Colts to win the Super Bowl. In 2014, Thomas and his wife Lauren started What You Give Will Grow, a foundation committed to improving the lives of those in need, with a strong focus on children and cancer initiatives, in New Orleans and the Gulf South communities.

The Middle School Rules of Thomas Morstead shares how Thomas learned about his cultural roots, handled being bullied for his appearance, and dealt with the disappointment of not making the high school varsity soccer team. Inspired by many, including his parents, Thomas pushes himself in every area of his life and boldly chases his dreams.

ISBN 9781424559008

2020-06-02

176 Pages

$14.99

Paperback

Carton Quantity: 60

About the Author

Picture of Sean Jensen

Sean Jensen

After he was adopted from South Korea, Sean Jensen’s first American Dream was to…join the Professional Bowlers Association.Seriously. He was in a league and everything.But a kid named Neil was better than he was, so Sean shifted his focus to tennis… then baseball… then basketball and soccer. Despite an obvious passion for sports and even some modest athletic success, Sean realized a future in the NBA or Premier League was dubious.So Sean continued to play sports, he delivered sports (actually, he was a carrier for the Boston Globe), and he analyzed sports for his high school newspaper. On many Fridays after school, Sean would call the phone number (yes, he was in high school before email) listed under the columns written by Michael Wilbon and Tony Kornheiser of the Washington Post. He’d ask them . . .

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